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Social anthropology explores social and cultural diversity of contemporary world drawing on a distinct research method of ethnography — an in-depth participant observation of human communities and institutions. Socio anthropology pays particular attention to ways in which these communities and institutions describe and identify themselves. Having emerged as a sociocultural study of non-western ‘others’, anthropology is now focusing on all types of societies and cultures, including ‘our’ own. This English language-taught minor offers a project-oriented introduction to this discipline, its theory and history. Its methodological focus enables students to learn this discipline’s skills that are used both in academic research and applied fields from international marketing and social policies to museum practices and public history.

Course abstracts:



Workload: 20 credits 

Educational programmes limitation: none

Sign up status: from 13 March 2018

Minimal Enrolment:  60 students 

Maximun Enrolment: 120 students

Teaching timespan:  2018-2020

Target students: admitted in 2017 

Planned teaching site: Promyshlennaia, 17

Selection criteria:

  • Standing on student ranking
  • English language proficiency no lower than B1 (Intermediate), sufficient for reading academic texts and talking part in discussion
  • Interest in sociocultural differences

Learning outcomes

This minor makes up a package of four innovative research-led and project-oriented courses. It aims at developing a broad range of skills and competencies that complement basic critical, academic and applied competencies and include

  • Skills in communication across cultural and social barriers; ability to conduct conversation and research interviews with people who are different in age, social status, education, ethnicity and religion; understand this “other” point of view.
  • Skills in critical analysis of, and reflection on, one’s own perspective or point of view and its cultural and social categories. Ability to examine one’s own position from that of the culturally, socially or religiously “other.”
  • Skills and competencies in socio-cultural translation not simply between different languages but socio-cultural contexts. 
  • Diplomatic skills of tolerance and respect for the position of the other. 
  • Ethnography as a skill that could be used in applied work.